Thursday, May 26, 2011

Those UNeducational Cartoons!

One of those silly YT Skeptics once complained that you didn’t expect to be instructed about Biblical scholarship in a cartoon format. That’s silly as an objection anyway, but as it happened, Mrs. H and I saw a show on the space program the other day where it was noted that NASA had used an animated figure, Andy the Astronaut, to teach adults what would happen to humans in the vacuum of space without proper protection. As it happens, someone had this vid on their Facebook page, and you can see the link below. Andy is put through all sorts of cartoon mayhem, too – stuff these stuffy noses would regard as “immature”.

I asked my media consultant if he could give me any more examples of adult education using cartoons, since I recalled Disney used to do some of that. He described the list as “virtually endless” and gave me several examples. I looked for as many as I could on YT so you can see them, too. (Added 12/18/2011: I found that a couple of these are no longer on YT.)

Yes, I'm belaboring a point. This is fundy atheists we're talking about, and they're the sort who will say a dead horse they're beating crossed the finish line ahead of yours.

Bert the Turtle for the "Duck and Cover" campaign.


Woody Woodpecker explaining space flight in Destination Moon.



Reddy Kilowatt explaining electricity (removed).


Three Looney Tunes shorts explained economics, using characters like Sylvester and Elmer Fudd. These were sponsored by the Alfred Sloan Foundation. (Removed.)

Disney's Victory Through Air Power promoted the Air Force.



Disney's Man Into Space promoted the space program.

Disney's Seven Dwarfs from Snow White promoted innoculation.

Warner used the character Hook for a series of Navy shorts and Private Snafu for the Army. These were written by Theodore Geisel aka Dr. Seuss.



When he was in the military, Stan Lee gained favor by making comic books explaining military procedures.

The Japanese regularly use both manga and anime to educate people, of all ages.

Animated characters, like Tony the Tiger, are used to "educate" the public about breakfast cereals and other products. Animated graphics are used to demonstrate how products work, like the function of a razor blade or a weed killer.

Andy the Astronaut

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